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friend, he and i have been together and political offices, a government responsibility for a very long time. more than three years. when he decided not to run again and my other colleague who was part of team north dakota was defeated, it was less rewarding for me personally to be here. less enjoyable for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the oth
of climate change. >> oh dear. susan? >> federal government rate of the gibson guitar factory. they confiscated the merchandise because a small business took some wood -- that was the incorrect level of thickness. >> interesting. what a loss. >> the worst political theater? how the right turned benghazi tragedy into theater of the absurd. >> are you reading that now? >> i wanted to get it right and concise. >> listen to me now and watch this. understood reported story of 2012 the bright side of mexico. the bright side of mexico. but particularly its economy. you call mexico went down to a failed state on the program. now in the midst of a manufacturing rebound be exports up to 14%. up from 11%. creating jobs, boosting gdp and drawing mexican immigrants from the united states back home. okay. the most overreported story of 2012. pat? >> the election of 2012 primary and general election and the fiscal cliff. >> eleanor? >> political gaffes. i like to fire people. you didn't build that, corporations are people too my friend. and -- the -- what is it? the private sector is doing j
its emissions is through switching from coal to gas, and that was government innovation 30 years ago developing some tracking technology that no one saw a few years ago, and -- that proponents would say that that switch is a good thing, it's reduced carbon emissions more than kyoto or anything else has been technology innovation and markets. >> there are two different things though. the gas -- yes, if gas were treated as the transition fuel allowing us to leave the coal in the ground and be working on the successor to gas so that that's all we burn, then we could actually meet the targets. but that's not what's happening its exactly -- they're actually going after every fuel they can find. it's fracking -- in addition to tar sands, in addition to drilling in the arctic, in addition to mountain top removal, and in addition to tar shale, that's why they say, united states is gonna be the saudi arabia of oil. how is that? we're gonna cook the rockey mountains and drip oil out the bottom. and that's gonna be -- that's almost -- it's 50% more energy to get that oil out. we -- and the frac
of slavery? well, last week the federal government as it does, you know, once or twice a year came out with its latest figures on birthrights. and in particular on one i'm going to point to is the illegitimacy rate or out-of-wedlock births. here they are. 72.3% of african-americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, it's 53.3%. for whites it's still pretty high, but it's 29.1 percent. and for asians it's 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of ten, six out of ten, five out of ten for blacks, american end yangs and latinos. these are the so-called underrepresented minorities that get racial preferences. and then fewer than three out of ten and fewer than two out of ten for whites and aiz items -- asians, people who are typically discriminated against. it is no accident that these figures line up quite well with how well different groups are doing not only in terms of education, but in terms of crime and, you know, whatever social indicator you want. that is the real problem. and, of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences and univers
whether the government should be throwing your tax dollars at industry the first place. i asked robert bryce, senior fellow at the manhattan institute about this issue. let's start with the tax credit. >> sure. gerri: this is industry, let's face it they don't have a whole lot to show for themselves yet we subsidize them to the tune of $1.2 billion. why? >> remember the industry said we're all about reducing carbon dioxide. that was the whole argument. now it shifted we create jobs argument. if congress does not extend production tax credit we'll lose 37,000 jobs. they might get an extension but there is big push among utilities, a lot of groups to end the tax credit and it very well could be ended. gerri: it doesn't work that well. 84% fail to produce electricity when the demand is great. as a solution to our energy problems how would you rate it? >> it is not a solution and it is wholly dependent on electric utilities and electric generation that can be dispatched. we can't count on wind. when demand is highest wind output is generally at its lowest. that's a big problem. gerri: iron
"our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. there are two separate propositions that are pertinent to any consideration of the role of religion in american politics. one is an empirical question. is it a fact that the success of a democracy requires a religious people governing themselves by religious norms? the second question is a question of logic. does belief in america as distinctive and democracy, a limited government whose limits are defined by the natural rights of the government, do those entail religious beliefs? regarding the e
minister has laid out how he plans to govern the country. he's back in the role he held five years ago. he said he and his cabinet will make every effort to tackle the challenges japanese face. >> translator: a strong economy is essential to japan's future. my cabinet will carry out bold financial policies, well-timed fiscal policies, and a strategy to encourage private investment towards economic growth. my cabinet will carry out these economic policies and achieve results. >> abe said he and his ministers will revamp japan's foreign policy. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south can korea and even the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening u.s./japan alliance is the first step towards rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised his government would take the lead in rebuilding northeastern japan. he will achieve results as soon as possible to regain the trust of the japanese people. he said his cabinet is designed to overcome crisis. he was el
boundary to implement. the order required the government to obtain a warrant and show probable cause. these are the same basic commonsense protections we've had in place for other types of searches. this development required individualized and particular orders from the fisa court to conduct investigations. let's fast forward to 2001. president bush decided in secret to authorize the national security agency to start a new program of warrantless surveillance inside the united states. this is in complete contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress ex
-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much
profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bl
violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking about is wider than simply banning adoptions. it's russia's retaliation for the act that bans russians officials
. the government has called on the country to unite in prayer instead for hugo chÁvez. >> international peace negotiations in syria urging the international community to push the government and rebels into talks. without talks, they want the country could become a failed state ruled by warlords for the -- warlords. tortured and disfigured bodies have been discovered north of damascus. at least 10 people killed and 40 others wounded, seven people were killed from the same family. bombs also incur code. a short time ago as spoke to bbc but said the attacks come at a difficult time politically for iraq. >> clearly, the most at that stands out the most is the one you mentioned south of baghdad where apparently, and normal, ordinary home was blown up and seven people were killed inside. but the other attacks have been more or less standard, attacks on security forces and shiites -- shia religious processions. security forces were trying to dismantle a rocket that was to be launched in the direction of an air base. a bomb went off right next to them and one was or two were killed, and four were wou
post reports the yemeni government tried to hide u.s. responsibility for the attack by taking credit for carrying it out. the yemeni government also initially claimed only militants were killed in the strike, or forced to withdraw that claim after mourners tried to bring the dead bodies to the gates of the presidential residence. according to the washington post, the attack has devastated the community and militants in surrounding areas have gained more recruits for their fight against the u.s.-backed yemeni government since it occurred. diplomatic cables released by wikileaks in 2010 show the u.s. and yemen have repeatedly covered up the use of u.s. warplanes to bomb yemen. according to the bureau of investigative journalism, covert u.s. operations have killed up to 171 civilians there including 35 children over the past decade. a top syrian general responsible for preventing military defections has defected himself to syria's opposition brigit major-general abdul al-shallal, the head of syria's military police, crossed into neighboring turkey and a daring break with the regime of s
acts and other, government properties and government records so people can follow. >> yes, two house committees controlled by the republicans are now investigating the richard windsor issue. i hope they will ask that question. how widespread is this illegal practice? who else has been doing it? let's see those records. there needs to be a wide spread investigation here. and i hope that the republican controlled house of representatives will do a good job of it. tom: i don't even know how do you, that they are not looking around at outside e-mails this is almost a paula brad broadwell, getting someone else involved. finding out where are the e-mails. >> i think it is clear the obama administration, and remember president obama promised his would be the most transparent transparent administration is mystery, we will need cabinet secretaries and other high obama appointees before a commity and swear them, take their testimony under oath where they have used the secret e-mail acouncil account to evad. tom: talking about fact maybe now that president will include west virginia in the co
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
again to swiftly join his government and put an end to deflation. he says it's only natural for the government to get involved in shaping monetary policy noting that conventional steps have failed to pull japan out of the drawn-out price downturn. abe made his call with officials of the japan business federation or keidanren on tuesday. >> translator: soon after we form a new cabinet tomorrow, i hope the government can establish a policy accord with the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2%. the bank should be held accountable to meeting the target. >> last week boj policymakers decided to decide whether to set the 2% target in january. the bank's current goal is 1%. meanwhile the keidanren chairman is stepping up efforts to lift the nation's sagging economy. he said the landslide election victory signals the party's hope to regain a strong japan. >> translator: i think a wide variety of policies including monetary policy should be implemented to get the economy back on track. they will together help trigger economic growth again. >> he also expressed his support fo
for circumstances when the government searches through its database of captured communications looking for information on individual american citizens. otherwise, by means of these so-called backdoor searches, the government may conduct significant warrantless surveillance of american persons. i believe this current practice is inconsistent with core fourth amendment privacy protections and needs to be reformed. during consideration of fisa in the judiciary committee, senator durbin and i introduced a bipartisan amendment to address this very problem. the language of our amendment is identical to that offered by senators wyden and udall during consideration of fisa by the select committee on intelligence. the amendment clarifies that section 702 does not permit the government to search its data base of fisa materials to identify communications of a particular united states person. in effect, it would require the government to obtain a warrant before performing such queries involving an american person's communications. the amendment is limited in scope. it excludes from the warrant req
that with fans.hrough you can use facebook, twitter, youtube, and, you know, tolea topple a government. gove it's harder to put down aardto revolution occurring over the web than kill a charismatic leader or bomb headquarters. you can make progress by the way it's spread out, but if you're . itizen on facebook, you may not realize what you are getting yourself into. in part it's because facebook's what you terms 'rof service shift without warning. servi shift initially when you joined, they said we'll just share with your friends, people you designate. in 2009, they changed it to make your friends' pictures and names public. well, they were american citizens with friends and relatives in teheran, and thesen as ricans were critics of the iranian government. what happened was, you know, without their knowledge or of consent, the pictures areat public. their friends and relatives wers be beat up, were jailed, and soiens forth. something even as simple as your friends can make a difference.ls edin the past years, there's ben highs and lows in twitter, andd yo've seen the arab spring.d, we've seen t
to avoid the fiscal cliff as the government starts taking steps to buy more time before the u.s. hits the debt ceiling. the yen hits a two-year low against the dollar as the new japanese government battles to weaken currency. exports are rising, pushing the nikkei to its strongest gain in 20 years. .shares of toyota are heading higher after the u.s. settled a class action lawsuit. the $1 billion payment is already priced in. okay. welcome to "worldwide exchange." plenty of news to watch out of washington. all of this week, we thought it would be a quiet one. but i won't be inside the beltway if they want to get something done. the u.s. will hit the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling come monday. in a letter to congressional leaders, geithner says treasury will begin taking steps to save the government about $2 billion. geithner says it's harder to predict a time frame because the ongone fiscal cliff talks make it difficult to forecast next year's budget. among the measures treasury will take including suspending state and local government securities and investments in the federal employee pe
. recall that in past years a couple decades ago when we became disenchanted with the government and military of pakistan, we cut off militaryoff assistance to the pakistani military and that led to very negative consequences so while some of these choices are very difficult, i am inclined in that direction of greater rather than lesser engagement. i don't think there's any point in just wiping our hands of these situations. lou: you talk about declining powers, does the obama administration's intelligence council in a new report i just referred to talk about the day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but the so-called first among equals.t m they project around 2030. your thoughts and your reckoning on whether or not you agree with that, they will come if not declining of other powers. >> i certainly think since the financial crisis back in 2007, 2008, there has been a tendency to write this down, if you will, but i think many of those assessmentsit have been unduly pessimistic and even downright wrong at times. we are still the most powerful economy in the wo
of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites.
debate be had on what the rule is that government plays. ultimately, that is what we have to do. there is a debate to be had. should it be a carbon tax, a cat capt. trade legislation? there are now conservative groups who are advancing with free-market branded solutions. the other day, a filler in the conservative booth, came out in support of a carbon tax. [applause] grover norquist chemo for about 16 hours. -- came out for about 16 hours. [laughter] definitely carbon taxes is bubbling up. rush right. and from a surprising source. people on the conservative side of the political spectrum, ultimately, i should not be a bar -- a partisan political issue. the day the sandy hit, i was with many people. >> of is just about to touch on that. fires burned homes with their democrats for republicans. the climate system does not care. hopefully, what we can do as scientists, is checked the risks and then the location details. but that is a whole different ball game. >> my name is carol stone. do you think the mayan calendar this year will have any effect? and what is the effect of the po
less money in your paycheck. >> the government has to bite the bullet with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts. more than half of that is to the defense budget. >> they say families may need austerity calculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need in the future to decide if you need the next big picture. doug? >> doug: thank you, molly. residents of the webster new york neighborhood set ablaze christmas eve have been allowed to return back to their homes. they say exconflict william spangler set the fire as a trap to lure firefighters to their death before turning the gun on himself. four were struck with bull lels, two survived and are in stable condition. >>> somber christmas day in newtown, connecticut. volunteers took three-hour shift to ensure 26 candles stayed lit at candle light vigil. it was filled with snow covered teddy bears, flowers and toys. two tv news hosts have a little explaining to do on the topic of gun control. that's later in the grapevine. up next, is the federal government shirking duty when it comes to public input about
. back in 2003, i got medicaid payments by the government to help the state's struggling with their medicaid costs. $20 billion will able to spread across the states to help them because they were unable to meet the rising costs. in 2017, they're going to have a larger share of the costs. we need that is taken care of. they did not know what the cost was. they put a number in as a place holder and it looked like i was doing something for my state when i wasn't. i was trying to get it for all the states. that is what happened. i wanted to get it knocked out -- if people wanted an opt out. the supreme court gave that. this got used against me as though i was trying to do something i should not have. i was not. the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor. i did not get a thank you from another governor, who was from another state. >> during that time, you experienced the radio talk-show host circuit and the cable tv circuit. what was that time like and what do you think the echo chamber in american politics today does? >> it is a difficult thing
. the government gets the money from us. i do not see how they have the right to sit there and play politics with each other and try to make decisions that are going to just benefit them. maybe a small part of the population. this is the united states. we're supposed to be tried to help everybody. we cannot be scared of what is clear to happen to us when many people are barely able to meet their bills. they may have to be afraid of what is going to happen to them. what kind of government would do that to their people? they should try to make us feel calm. like we are really going to get something done. host: from crawford, indiana this morning. on twitter -- another tweet i want to read this morning -- jodi wrtes in -- we will be taking your calls all of this morning for this segment and the next segment on the "washington journal." we told you what was going on in the senate. here is "roll-call" newspaper and what is being prepped in the house today -- alan ota writes, the speaker made it clear -- that is what is going on in the house. let's go to charles on a republican line from maryland.
of the confederation, that government is too weak so we are starting to write the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes. how did this all develop? >> guest: nowadays it's become fashionable among the people that support them rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from that leader like samuel adams or thomas jefferson or whoever and implied that in the second amendment is basically seen as a rate of the individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it became tyrannical. that is a misunderstanding. it was a political matter in the second amendment. it was a part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of the confederation led the founders to try to figure out a better way of governing this country, they came up with a constitution that is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for the ratification it became clear that they might not get the nine states they needed unless there were promises of still more controls ov
i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate prices plunged and we were in a financial panic i started to think more about ms. green and how she's survived ms. green and how she's survived many financial crisis. there were no diaries then i remember something that was said that nice girls keep diaries. bad girls do not have time last laugh and hetty gree
we are going to have to get eight bigger truck. that's what the government is trying to do. borrow the way out of debt. it is impossible . it never worked in the history of the world . dr. art's curve works every single time. >> we are up against the end of the show. we have kelly wright and healther childers. play us out in the new year or satted afternoon with your song all of the gold in california . thank you for watching and here is it larry gatlin. >> never was appropriate. ♪ all the gold in california. ♪ is in a bank in the middle of beverly hills in somebody else's name. >> a fox news alert. senate leaders now holding crucial fiscal cliff talks on capitol hill rushing to come up with a last ditch agreement to avoid deep spending cuts and year end tax hikes affecting the lives of every american, i'm kelly wright. >> i'm heather childers in for jamie colby. the 11th he hour scramble after a crucial meeting on friday, between president obama and the leaders of the house and senate and urged lawmakers to urge them to do whatever it takes to cut a deal. >> i'm modestly opti
with the gold standard. now, what could the greek government have done? two greek prime ministers. one from 2004 to 2009. in greece, greece has had experience with that since 1974 after the expiration of parliamentary democracy. government, regardless of which party is in government, the accelerator to create some kind of flimsy growth, at some point it became clear that we had a cliff. our debt situation would get too much. and then we would hit the brakes. austerity. which creates increased unemployment. but nevertheless, the debt was manageable. they did this up until 2004. 2004 was accelerated because of the olympics. the next government should have stopped it. but unfortunately government is government. government kept the foot firmly on the accelerator. why? because german capital was flowing to the country at cheap rates, financing ponzi schemes. it is just like the subprime market here where people were coerced to take loans that could not afford. similarly in greece. so, you had executives coming to greece, bribing politicians. the greek government -- they did not listen. then 2008. the
back to the mid-1950s has ever cut government spending. we continued to add spending every year, both parties guilty. why should that change? why should anyone watching us right now believe anybody in washington's going to be fiscally responsible? >> adam, it's the right question, and that's dwr i said a minute ago, we need a big deal. if it's a smaller deal, remember, we got to go to the debt ceiling discussion and some of the other trigger points and make sure we get the savings and the entitlement reform and the things we need to get this deficit and debt under control. it's about getting the economy on track and also getting the deficit under control. adam: you are a moderate, highly popular in the state of north dakota, and you have compromised with both sides on these issues, but the vast majority of the public looks at congress, all of you, the house of representatives and the senate looking at you guys with disgust. is that coming across in the halls of the capitol? do the people there understand what the people out here, the 310 million of us consider when we think about the
love this, as opposed to letting the government do it. we he don't need the government to do this. this is what americans can do. stuart: you've got the last word on me there, mark lanier, very good, very good. you walk away from your 227 million, mark, have a wonderful new year. >> thank you. stuart: a massive storm, serious stuff here, big storms through the u.s., high winds, snow, everybody came down and stranding a lot of travelers across the country and dumping inches of snow in some cities, actually feet in some areas. roadways in the northeast covered with snow, again, two feet of snow in some areas. big delays in a lot of airports. big headaches for holiday travelers, that storm is blamed for the at least six deaths. if congress and the president can't come up with a plan and we dive on that fiscal cliff, look what would happen to the average federal taxpayers, the average taxpayer is roughly 50,000 bucks a year and that person would pay a extra, 1238 per year in taxes. in fact, every taxpayer would pay more if we go over that cliff. clearly, that would be a hit to the ove
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
go into effect. those come in gradually and they could come in more gradually if the government officials thought there was going to be a deal and they better hold off. the real uncertainty i think is what the markets will do. we look like a country that isn't in control of its own destiny, because we're acting that way right now. if you're an investor, whether you're in some part of the united states or you're in some other part of the world, do you really want to buy american securities? do you want to invest in a country whose government isn't functioning? i don't think so. we could get a big market reaction, drop in the stock market. that might scare people. >> how quickly do you -- >> but it would also be a bad thing. in itself, it would contribute to the possibility of having another recession. >> how quickly do you think we'll feel tremors from the debt ceiling now that the treasury is beginning to talk about avoiding it. >> i think we're seeing uncertainty about absolutely everything. it's cumulative, it's the debt ceiling, it's the fiscal cliff, it's what taxes are goin
against the government when it became tyrannical. that is a misunderstanding. it was a political matter, the second amendment. that's partly what what became the bill of rights. the reason for it is after the unhappy experience of the articles of confederation, but the founders to figure out a better way of governing this country, they came up with the constitution, which as we know is full of checks and balances, but as was submitted to the states for ratification, it became clear that they might not get the nine states they needed unless their promises but still more controls over the potential for the federal government overstepping its powers and crashing the states, which was not the object. so the agreement was to come up with a set of amendments to it. and make that the first order of business when congress convened. but that promise when they did get the nine states to ratify and it went into effect in congress that it may be the first thing they started discussing this amendment. to make a long story short, instead of sprinkling them into this or that provision of the articles
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